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How to Beat and Treat Jock Itch


Are you physically active? Perhaps you regularly go to the gym, or take long walks or runs with your dog. Maybe you even belong to a sports league in your area, such as tennis or softball. Unfortunately, a minor, annoying downside of your pursuit of fitness could be jock itch, a pink, scaly, itchy rash on the inner thighs and groin. So what causes jock itch? And is there any way to get rid of it – or avoid it? Let’s take a closer look at this often unpleasant condition . . .

Are you physically active? Perhaps you regularly go to the gym, or take long walks or runs with your dog. Maybe you even belong to a sports league in your area, such as tennis or softball. If this sounds like you, you’re already well on the way to preventing all sorts of diseases and conditions such as heart disease and cancer.

But, a minor, annoying downside of your pursuit of fitness could be jock itch, a pink, scaly, itchy rash on the inner thighs and groin. It can be painful!

So what causes jock itch? And is there any way to get rid of it – or avoid it? Let’s take a closer look at this often unpleasant condition . . .

What causes jock itch?
Jock itch is caused by a fungus—often the same one that leads to the development of athlete's foot. Other names for this rash are ringworm of the crotch or tinea cruris.

Sometimes jock itch is transferred by a towel used first to dry the feet and then the groin area. It is much more common in men than women. Symptoms include itching of the groin or crotch, anal area, or inner thigh; slightly raised patches of dry or scaly rash in the groin area or on the inner thigh, often red or brownish red, with sharp borders; and redness of the skin.

Treatment Options
Your doctor or healthcare provider may recommend putting a nonprescription antifungal powder or spray on the affected area of your skin. Examples of such medicines are miconazole (Micatin), tolnaftate (Tinactin), and clotrimazole (Lotrimin).

For severe or chronic infection, you may need prescription medicine from your healthcare provider. You may need to take an oral antifungal medicine. Your provider may also prescribe medicine to put on your skin.

Sometimes the rash started by the fungus gets infected with bacteria. This is more likely to happen if you scratch the rash. If you have a bacterial infection, your healthcare provider may prescribe antibiotics.

With treatment, the symptoms will get better in two or three days. The rash should go away in three to four weeks. If the rash does not get better in a week, or it is not completely gone in a month, call your healthcare provider.

To take care of jock itch at home, follow your healthcare provider's instructions for using the medicine. Keep your skin clean and dry, and avoid chafing or rubbing the skin. Wear loosely fitting clothing, and try not to scratch.

Natural Solutions
Natural nutritional supplements may also help. Acidophilus is a beneficial bacteria helps the body kill fungus. B-complex vitamins boost the immune system and aid in healing and preventing infections. The herbs chamomile, calendula and sage may also be of benefit.

Don’t let jock itch put you on the sidelines! With the above information, you can beat and treat your jock itch effectively and safely.



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